#Bookreview Charlie and Pearl by Tammy Robinson #romance #Fridayreads

Pearl decides to move into her grandmother’s beach house to get away from a long term relationship that has ended and other painful events that have recently occurred. Wanting to isolate herself in a small town, she meets Charlie, who is mesmerised by her and her resolve to keep him away gradually softens. 

This hugely sentimental romance came highly recommended to me. After an unassuming slow burn start the pace picked up as did my curiosity about Pearl’s history and what she was hiding from Charlie. 

Her obvious attraction to easy going, laid back and surprisingly uncomplicated Charlie was not something she was expecting to experience. But despite her reluctance their romance blooms in a humorous way. 

However, as lovely as this read is, beware and keep a box of tissues on hand as it gets very sad. 

Links To Book: 

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Goodreads

#BookReview Confess by Colleen Hoover #Romance #wwwblogs

​Looking for a job, fate brings Auburn to an exclusive art gallery, where the eccentric owner, Owen, offers her the job. However, the undeniable chemistry between them is overshadowed by secrets they are keeping and issues they face in their lives. Can the past hold the key to their future happiness.

I’m not a huge romance reader but found this sentimental romance a compelling read. The mystery behind the connection between Auburn and Owen kept me turning the pages rapidly and the premise of Owen’s artwork, painting based on anonymous confessions was also an irresistible hook in the story. 

I enjoyed this read very much and it ignited an interest in me to explore more titles in the romance genre, instead of trying to avoid it. I highly recommend Confess and with Spring in the air I hope to bring you a series of romance book reviews.

Links To Book: 

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Goodreads

#BookReview Sarah by Teri Polen #YA #horror #Tuesdaybookblog 

​Cain witnesses a number of creepy inexplicable occurrences in his bedroom and the attic storage space above it. When he finds out that his house was linked to the disappearance of a student from his school, he suspects his home might be haunted but doesn’t count on the vengeance that ensues.

This YA horror thriller did some things very well, such as, the atmospheric haunting of Cain’s room, depicting his relationship with Finn, his bestfriend, and his relationship with his younger sister, Maddie and his Mum. However, I found the pace variable throughout and the story a little repetitive, but the book ended on a cliffhanger and I am intrigued enough to pick up the next instalment if there is one in this series.

A haunting read.

Links To Book: 

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Goodreads

Flawed Characters: Real Life vs. Fiction #books #bookbloggers #Weekendbloghop

After reading and appreciating a string of flawed characters recently: Audra, Nora, Kate, Isabel and Crazy Amy to name just a few, I was thinking about how I would perceive such characters in real life and shamefully concluded that I probably wouldn’t find their individual flaws quite as charming in real life. The irony of this isn’t lost on me.

It seems to be much more palatable to read about characters with a dangerous edge than to accept those around us in real life live with flaws we find unforgivable. No doubt the self-preservation reflex to avoid unpredictability and danger is the root of how we react to aberrant characters in real life, but I really wish I was laid back enough to appreciate the beauty of not quite moral decisions people make in real life.

With the advent of social media it is much more prevalent to make damning judgments of our fellow man vociferously and vocally, but isn’t this just diversionary tactics to diminish and camouflage our own flaws? When we are criticising others we boost our own moral values and attain a superior position from which to look down on others. It mitigates our insecurity to highlight and emphasis our moral security. Is this why we like reading flawed characters in fiction? Are we all looking to be better than the next person?

What is behind our need to find villains and vilify them, when we find a flaws and all character in a book so gratifying to read? Today I ask more questions than I can satisfactorily answer, so please do share your thoughts on flawed literary characters and our aversion to real life flaws. I am genuinely intrigued. 

 

Advance #BookReview Here and Gone by Haylen Beck #thriller

​On a journey to get away from her husband, Audra is on her way to Arizona with her two children, Sean and Louise. She is stopped by a policeman and arrested, but once in the police holding cells she’s told she never had any children with her. Suspicion now runs to Audra being responsible for the disappearance of her own children, but will the more sinister truth come to light.

A taut suspense thriller of corrupt authorities and a shadowy underworld, Audra is the underdog in this thriller, vulnerable with a questionable past which makes her an easy target for the unscrupulous.

A tense read. This book will be published on 13th July 2017.

Links To Book:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Goodreads

#BookReview Eyes Like Mine by Sheena Kamal #thriller #Netgalley 

​When the adoptive parents of a daughter she gave up contact her, Nora, is stunned to find out that she’s missing. With very little being done to find Bonnie, Nora steps into the breach to track down the teenager herself, but it will require visiting the past and opening wounds that she never truly laid to rest.

Nora is an unusual character and makes questionable judgments but that only seems to make her more intriguing as we piece together her past and present. Living on the fringes of society this flawed protagonist with very little trust to spare cares more than she lets on and is a survivor in the true sense of the word.

An impressive debut and a memorable crime thriller protagonist I look forward to reading again.

Links To Book:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Goodreads

#BookReview A Taste of His Own Medicine by Linda Fawke #Tuesdaybookblog #RBRT 

I chose this book to read from Rosie Amber’s Book Review Team book list.

A tantalising thriller about the reunion of a group of pharmacology graduates who meet after thirty years, but Kate, a flying student who was once top of the class has revenge in mind for those who wronged her years ago. However, will revenge go to plan and will the secrets from student day emerge once again? 

This book became more gripping as I read and ended on quite a cliff-hanger, what I really wasn’t expecting was how dark the characters are and how malevolent parts of this story was to read. I’m really hoping there’s a second book soon as I can’t wait to see how the story ends.

With twists turns and revelations galore there is rarely a dull moment in this page-turner.

Links To Book:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Goodreads

#BookReview The Light Between Oceans by M L Stedman #histfic #books

​A historical fiction novel about a couple who live on Janus Island, off the coast of Western Australia, in the early nineteenth century, as the husband Tom, man’s the lighthouse and his wife Isabel helps him around the island. When a boat carrying a body and a baby wash up, the decisions they make will change everything, not just for them but the family of the man and baby miles away. 

A truly moving novel that explores and depicts characters with a huge amount of depth and understanding. The small town setting of the story as well as the isolated life Tom and Isabel live on Janus Island was intriguing and the period aspect of the novel seemed very convincing. 

So engrossed was I in reading about Tom and Isabel, I finished the book within twenty-four hours and found it touching. I am not a huge romance reader, but even I couldn’t be helped but touched by Tom’s devotion to Isabel. A story that will no doubt stay with me for a long time.

Links To Book: 

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Goodreads

#BookReview Exposure (Crazy Amy Book Two) by Rose Edmunds #RBRT #Sundaybloghop #thriller

I chose this book to read from Rosie Amber’s Book Review Team book list.

Amy returns in book two of this series after leaving her last employers and, taking advantage of the remainder of her private health insurance, goes to rehab. The very publicised death of an old colleague involves her as she is mentioned in his dying words, but why? Matters are complicated further as she teams up with an old flame to get to the bottom of what the man’s dying words meant, but her investigation puts her right inside the hornets nest where no one can be trusted and Amy is in mortal danger. Will she uncover the truth and get out intact? 

Absolutely love reading Amy, she’s a character that amuses and intrigues as I’m never quite sure what she’ll do next. A breath of fresh air from the sanitised female protagonist, Amy is proof women can be human, flawed and less moral than Snow White and still be good reading. 

I found this second instalment more suspenseful than the first one with a rapid pace that kept me on the edge of my seat, but the book still managed to fill some blanks in Amy’s troubled past. A mystery to keep me guessing as well as revisiting a much loved character, I recommend this rare type of thriller, a finance thriller, to all thriller fans. You won’t be disappointed. 

Links To Book:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Goodreads

What Do  You Do When You Are Tugged Down The Rabbit Hole (again)? #mentalhealth #depression #weekendblogshare

Most of the time I manage to maintain a sort of equilibrium, but occasionally I slip into a darkness akin to what it would feel like if the dementors in Harry Potter were real. In fact, the depression I am currently suffering from is real. It takes a lot of insight and self-awareness to realise a low mood, flat effect and compulsive pessimistic thoughts are not quite a facile lifestyle choice.

I am lucky to have an excellent sounding board in a therapy group I deeply care for, but when in session I focus on others and pragmatic problem-solving rather than expressing what I feel. Circling emotions is easier than expressing them. It’s a fear of being ashamed of showing my true emotions that hold me back. I know I would tell anyone else that they have nothing to be ashamed of when expressing how they feel in a depressive episode, but convincing myself is harder.

It’s been a long time since I found myself feeling this low and I frightened myself this morning when I woke to utter the words, “I want to die.” I have no reason to feel this way. I am well supported, feel pleasure from doing many things as hobbies, I have the freedom to choose to do anything I wish, but alas that voice in my head tells me I’m not a doo-er. My reading has slowed since my mental health began to deteriorate early this year. For the first time I find myself behind three books in my Goodreads Reading Challenge. It’s taken me weeks to write a suitable blog post about the truth of my mood.

When in therapy there’s a special type of shame that comes with failing to remain optimistic. It’s seriously like I’m failing a course, but I cannot deny how I feel and I no longer have the energy to push it to one side. I’m circulating a crisis, but I’m not being furtive about it. If I was having an acute asthma attack it wouldn’t carry the shame I’m burdened with for having an acute depressive episode, and why not? Administering drugs to ease someone’s airways is heroic as opposed to acknowledging the darkness in their thoughts, which at best is indulging narcissism at worst aiding laziness, if you ignorantly believe anyone would want to feel this way.

I’ve been open and communicated my concerns about myself, now I have to rely on that old adage of time and the new mindfulness based cognitive behavioural techniques I have read and championed. Not so easy when I feel I’m being smothered in a lead curtain of impending doom.I’m tired of being me and no amount of reminding myself how lucky I am, the miracle that is life is so rare and precious, can convince me I have a purpose. 

This too shall pass, they tell me. Eventually.