#BookReview By Any Means Necessary by Stephen Sayers #Fridayreads #thriller

​A dark, gritty crime thriller set in Newcastle, which sees Tommy Myers, a promising young boxer, make a decision that changes his life forever after his sister is attacked. The New path Tommy finds himself on will put him in direct odds with a local crime lord and have tragic consequences.

This book starts on the ground running and then we are taken back in time to understand Tommy’s character and his relationship with his family. As dark and gritty as this novel is, it was easy to immerse myself in Tommy’s story and despite some violent and difficult instances, I kept turning the page to find out what happened to Tommy and his loved ones.

My first read from this author and hopefully not my last a very gripping crime thriller.

Links To Book:

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Goodreads

#BookReview Scare Me by Richard Parker #Thriller

​This gruesome thriller starts off very well at a good pace and I found myself reading the plight of Will Frost with my heart in my throat. Will is rung at midnight and directed to Google himself, on doing so he finds himself looking at a website showing his home and pictures of other homes he must go to in order to pick up clues to find the whereabouts of his abducted pregnant daughter, Libby.

Each of the homes contains a scene more gruesome and Will races against time to find his daughter whilst his wife tries to find out who could be behind this game of abduction and blackmail. I found the pace slowing midway through the book and if it wasn’t for the plot twist in the last quarter of the book I would have found the book gorey but uneventful.

Overall after I finished this read I found myself wanting more, there was a distinct lack of suspense and terror, which made this an enjoyable but average read for me. This is the first book from this author and I would pick up his next to see how he comes along. 

Links To Book:

Amazon UK

Amazon US
Goodreads

#BookReview The Evil Inside by Philip Taffs #bookbloggers

I was kindly provided with a review copy of this book by Booklover Catlady Publicity in exchange for review.

A young family move to New York to make a clean start after tragic events, but their new start is tainted by events none of them can put behind them. The results are for all in the family to decline mentally as communication and relationships become strained. Can the family endure and come through the challenges of a new country intact?

I felt a bit disappointed by this horror read once I had finished it, mainly due to the fact I severely disliked Guy Russell, who had, in my opinion, very few redeeming qualities and didn’t seem particularly committed to his family or his job, rather just his own hedonistic existence.

I didn’t find the story scary or particularly spooky and to me this read more like a psychological thriller than a horror, even though I didn’t feel the author had a particularly great grasp of psychology to call this a psychological thriller.

The positive of this book was that I was intrigued enough to be curious as to how the story would end to actually read it to the end, but I will be making a point to do more research before I accept a book as a real horror read on face value again.

Links To Book:
Amazon UK
Amazon US
Goodreads

image

Book Review: Games People Play: Volume 1 by Owen Mullen

I was kindly provided with a review copy of this book by Booklover Catlady Publicity in exchange for an honest review.

A family trip to the beach ends in disaster as thirteen month old Lily is abducted, leaving her parents distraught. PI Charlie Cameron is hired by Lily’s father to locate a woman he is convinced took his daughter. The police are working to locate Lily but DS Andrew Geddes is convinced the abduction of children is serial and the work of one individual.

Charlie along with sidekick, Patrick, is warned off interfering in a police investigation by DS Andrew Geddes, who sends a missing student case his way. Charlie has much emotional baggage as he periodically recollections the day his sister disappeared and the effects that has had on his family and his relationship with them.

The whereabouts and fate of baby Lily is the central mystery that kept me turning the pages of this thriller. The book packs in a lot of characters and side stories plus romance into this first volume of the PI Charlie Cameron thriller series. As a debut it is a very engaging read and I really warmed to Cameron as a character with his flaws. I was less interested in his romantic life and, personally, for me that aspect of the book seemed a little superfluous. I personally feel the book needed a decent editor to even out the pace and sharpen the story, which deviates arguably necessarily to give us an introduction to numerous characters and aspects of Cameron’s life.

Cameron’s missing student case was engaging too and I was delighted when he unravelled the clues to solve that mystery, leaving the rest of the book to find baby Lily. As I predicted the mystery of what happened to Cameron’s sister is something we are left to contemplate as it will no doubt be playfully revealed in a future volume.

I do think this thriller has spades of appeal and if you like gritty UK crime thrillers set in Scotland with a private investigator in the lead like the Cormoran Strike books, then I would urge you to give this one a read. Despite the fact the book deals in child abductions it was not difficult reading as the subject was sensitively and respectfully approached.

This book is available to read for free to Kindle Unlimited subscribers.

Links To Book:
Amazon UK
Amazon US
Goodreads

image

Advance Book Review: Don’t Say A Word (The Strangers Series) by Jennifer Jaynes

I was kindly provided with a review copy of this book by Booklover Catlady Publicity in exchange for an honest review.

The next book in The Strangers series, sees Allie living with Bitty, her adoptive mother, and her son, Sammy. Johnny, Sammy’s father, is gone a lot and Allie is having serious doubts about her relationship with Johnny. Despite everything she went through, Allie has each a difficulty won peace living with Bitty and Sammy. Bitty is still fostering and when she takes in a set of twelve year old twin girls Zoe and Carrie Parrish, her respite from the fear and danger all her life returns with a vengeance.

Zoe and Carrie were found in their home huddled together in a wardrobe, whilst the bodies of their parents were found in another bedroom. Carrie is not talking and Zoe seems to have no recollection of what happened the night of her parents’ murder.

This thriller deals with difficult themes as Allie and Bitty both deal with the issues facing the New foster children in their care. Allies has a new found confidence and sense of responsibility, as well as a strong mother figure in Bitty.

He story of the twins, Zoe and Carrie, is terrifying and had me on the edge of my seat whilst the tale of what happened to the girls unravels. Although I have read the other books in The Strangers series, it is not necessary to have read them to enjoy this book, however, as griping as this book is, I think it lacked the edge of the first two in the series.

This book is available for pre-order from Amazon publication date is 3 May 2016. It will also be available to read for free to Kindle Unlimited subscribers.

Links To Book:
Amazon UK
Amazon US
Goodreads

image

The Breaks

Cherished blog readers, I have not been well enough to read for the last forty-eight hours and have had to put my blogging aside as I recuperate from what I gather is an exacerbation in the natural progression of my diabetes and idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (for once my OCD is being upstaged!).

Rest assured I am in no danger of medical neglect as I spent yesterday out at doctor’s surgery and hospital appointments, from 9 am to 5 pm, with more on the way.

I haven’t forgotten you and I am just taking a brief hiatus, hopefully until my limitless fatigue, dizziness and nausea abates allowing me to lose myself once again between the pages of a book. Living here in reality without a book is somewhat jarring for me as I read voraciously.

I fear I maybe at the precipice of a change in lifestyle and intensity of medical support I need but am hoping once the dust settles, all efforts will enable me to get back into the swing of things again.

I will post more book reviews as soon as I am able, thank you for taking the time to read my blog.

image

Book Review: Irina’s Eye by HW Freedman

I was kindly provided with a review copy of this book by Booklover Catlady Publicity in exchange for an honest review.

Whilst trying to escape from Czechoslovakia after WW2, Vaclav Bezek is unable to save Irina who is shot by the soldiers. As he holds her she is shot again and her eye falls into his hand. Before this shot she told him to run and Vaclav does, ever since living with the guilt of Irina’s death.

Vaclav eventually finds himself in America and the book tells us the story from his past in Czechoslovakia and his subsequent escape and journey to the States as well as his present story as a thespian. Vaclav has never forgotten about Irina and her memory manifests in an unusual way which he attributes to a link in his spirituality. He becomes obsessed with Faust and experiments with tantric meditation looking to deepen his connection. He has the opportunity to return to Czechoslovakia to see his mother where he receives the most unexpected news.

I found reading about Vaclav’s past more interesting and alluring than his present in mid-60s New York. In his present he isn’t a particularly likeable character with episodes of rage and violence, but also his obsessions are static, in that we don’t seem to learn more about him and he doesn’t seem to evolve at all in his present, which makes for some repetition, which Labour’s the point he is stuck and isn’t particularly exciting reading.

The twist was worth the read though and I was disappointed that a lot of what I read was just a metaphor and for me I don’t believe there was a convincing underlying theme here, just the power of suggestion.

A quick and on the whole interesting read post WW2, from a unique perspective.

Links To Book:
Amazon UK
Amazon US
Goodreads

image

Book Review: Remorseless by Will Patching

I was kindly provided with a review copy of this book by Booklover Catlady Publicity in exchange for an honest review.

Peter Leech who has spent the past eighteen years in prison and is up for parole. Leech appears to be a manipulative and dangerous sociopath who was found guilty of the brutal murder of his parents when he was eighteen. News of his possible parole is most unwelcome by his brother Shaun and his family. Judy is an officer of the court assigned to write a report about Leech’s suitability for parole, with the help of forensic psychiatrist Colin, who initially gave evidence regarding Leech’s mental health in the original trial.

As the friendship develops between Collin and Judy, she admits Leech frightens her but is determined to give an unbiased report on his behalf anyway, meanwhile Collin has demons of his own to banish after a horrific accident that killed his wife. However, neither Collin nor Judy are aware that parole for Peter Leech is a means for revenge.

This dark, gritty and engaging psychological thriller is driven by how well the characters are written and the twists and turns that keep you at the edge of your seat. The violence is stark from the outset, as is fitting with Leech being an inmate.

As much as I enjoyed the aspects of what was done well in this novel a few things did irritate me, the medical management of acute asthma or seizure by a lay individual does not involve adrenaline, and I was loathed to find one I instance where instead of have the word of was used, which is a grammatical error which peeves me immensely. However, overall the story and plot was enough to keep me reading and I was engrossed to find out whether Leech would get his parole or his revenge.

This could have been a potentially a five star read if it had a decent proof read.

Links To Book:
Amazon UK
Amazon US
Goodreads

image

Book Review: Sister, Psychopath! By Maggie James

I was provided with a review copy of this book from Booklover Catlady Publicity in exchange for an honest review.

A disturbingly compelling read and my first from this author, about the relationship between two half-sisters, who do not get on with each other. When Megan was four she was excited when she learned she was going to have a half-sister or brother, but as the years went by she grew to distrust and see through the manipulative behaviour of Chloe, her younger half-sister. Involved in a very tricky love-triangle Megan is eventually aware of just how much she has lost to Chloe but will she ever redress the balance?

A truly electrifying read that delivered twist after twist and kept me turning the pages. Sister, Psychopath! is a book for psychological thriller readers and anyone who likes being shocked over and over again. Definitely not one to miss!

Links to Book:
Amazon UK
Amazon US
Goodreads

image

Book Review: Mortom by Erik Therme

I was provided with a review copy of this book from Booklover Catlady Publicity in exchange for an honest review.

The death of their cousin, Craig brings Andy and Kate to the small town of Mortom, where Andy is the sole beneficiary of Craig’s will. However, oddly he has to step foot in the house in order to inherit, in doing so Andy and a reluctant Kate are drawn into a dangerous game, in which, the stakes are higher than just a fortune to be inherited. As Andy becomes obsessives over the clues Craig has left for him a wedge is driven between brother and sister, but can they finish the game before anyone gets hurt?

I really enjoyed reading this mystery thriller, it gripped me right from the start as Andy and Kate are both flawed in their own ways and the fractious relationship between them added another dimension to this mystery.

Once I started this I could not put it down and highly recommend this unusual and quirky read. Mortom is available to read for free to Kindle Unlimited subscribers.

Links to Book:
Amazon UK
Amazon US
Goodreads

image